Capcom Q-Sound amp help?

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    • I don't think so @ZERO_MILES, my technology does something very different, for example, it can locate a instrument/voice/effect/etc underneath other sound and bring that instrument forward and send everything else back or acting as a healing tool like the one used in photoshop to erase voice narration of some source but still bring and back vocals forward.

      Here some real time demonstrations, notice how in the first video is possible to recover a violin sound underneath the music:



      The technology was developed to be used inside vehicles, considering the drivers position and the off center listening position, the processor can put Slash from Guns and Roses playing guitar in the backseat of your car and Axel singing back at you, kind of in your face experience. Over the years you hear about Stereo Sound Stage but you always experience this stage from a distance, this technology put you in the middle of stage using just two rear speakers of your car without the need to pre-encode anything.

      So, I don't know how that could help or benefit an arcade cabinet.
      Friends don't let friends play MAME
    • SmokeMonster wrote:

      This is extremely interesting, and I think this is the first time I've seen all of this discussed.

      So, what happens if you just send a regular stereo audio signal through the Q-Sound amp? I planned to turn one into a stand-alone amplifier for all of my arcade gaming, but maybe that's not ideal if it's going to apply Q-Sound filtering to the source.
      Nothing special,without the QSound encoding/matrix/mix it will output as a standard stereo sound.
      Maybe you could get some kick out of some albums mixed with QSound like Madonna, Paula Abdul or something of that nature, you should get a more wider spatial stereo sound.
      Friends don't let friends play MAME
    • The DSP on the CPS1Q and CPS2 actually does Q-SOUND processing but it generates a normal stereo signal which need further analog processing (the mathematical algorithm on the DSP takes the presence of the mixing circuit in consideration I suppose) so the game can control the position of the audio for the listener. There's a very complex API on the games for said effects, early games like "The Punisher" exposes it on the sound test menu. Because of the amount of data that has to be transferred, the communication between the sound and game processors use shared ram instead of simple registers like it was on the original CPS1.
    • Yeah this is very interesting. @wuemura, are you interested in splitting this into it's own thread with all Q-sound info and how it work in theory, etc?

      I am almost finished restoring my Capcom Q25 and I can't wait to try Q-sound as it is supposed to, with me sitting in front with no other cabinets throwing sound waves at it. ;) I also repaired the Q-sound amp and verified it is working great now!
    • l_oliveira wrote:

      The DSP on the CPS1Q and CPS2 actually does Q-SOUND processing but it generates a normal stereo signal which need further analog processing (the mathematical algorithm on the DSP takes the presence of the mixing circuit in consideration I suppose) so the game can control the position of the audio for the listener. There's a very complex API on the games for said effects, early games like "The Punisher" exposes it on the sound test menu. Because of the amount of data that has to be transferred, the communication between the sound and game processors use shared ram instead of simple registers like it was on the original CPS1.
      That is what people believe it does, if you take the new superctr and Valley Bell QSound engine and just play the music the QSound effects are incomplete. If you look at the superctr and Valley Bell code, that chip only does panning, volume, echo, delay, etc.[1][2]
      From what I understand, QSound is programmed inside the ROM, then QSound information is sent to QSound chip to put everything together and what makes the magic happens is the QSound power amp (don't know if there is a cross-over near the original speakers).

      Mitsurugi-w wrote:

      Yeah this is very interesting. @wuemura, are you interested in splitting this into it's own thread with all Q-sound info and how it work in theory, etc?

      I am almost finished restoring my Capcom Q25 and I can't wait to try Q-sound as it is supposed to, with me sitting in front with no other cabinets throwing sound waves at it. ;) I also repaired the Q-sound amp and verified it is working great now!
      Congratulations!

      Yes, if you think is better, can you split the post?
      I don't have too much to share in terms of theory on how exactly QSound works that I have already told, but it would be nice to hear from people that could take a better look on the QSound amp boards.

      You Don't need to wait, test this files on you smart tv or audio equipment using standard speakers.
      mediafire.com/file/t7k7gxn9zi9mbg7/wave-test.zip

      This is what you should experience with QSound:
      mediafire.com/file/3ey3fsutiwv1n3s/Ryu_Stage.zip

      Read the instructions here.
      Friends don't let friends play MAME
    • wuemura wrote:

      From what I understand, QSound is programmed inside the ROM, then QSound information is sent to QSound chip to put everything together and what makes the magic happens is the QSound power amp (don't know if there is a cross-over near the original speakers).
      I recently had the chance to examine a complete QSound kit a friend ordered from Japan, and it had no crossover near the speakers. The kit came with original speakers, and it had a filter cap on them, but that's it.
    • ZERO_MILES wrote:

      wuemura wrote:

      From what I understand, QSound is programmed inside the ROM, then QSound information is sent to QSound chip to put everything together and what makes the magic happens is the QSound power amp (don't know if there is a cross-over near the original speakers).
      I recently had the chance to examine a complete QSound kit a friend ordered from Japan, and it had no crossover near the speakers. The kit came with original speakers, and it had a filter cap on them, but that's it.
      Polyester cap?
      Friends don't let friends play MAME
    • wuemura wrote:

      ZERO_MILES wrote:

      wuemura wrote:

      From what I understand, QSound is programmed inside the ROM, then QSound information is sent to QSound chip to put everything together and what makes the magic happens is the QSound power amp (don't know if there is a cross-over near the original speakers).
      I recently had the chance to examine a complete QSound kit a friend ordered from Japan, and it had no crossover near the speakers. The kit came with original speakers, and it had a filter cap on them, but that's it.
      Polyester cap?
      Regular electrolytic cap, as far as I recall.