Just bought a broken Raiden 2 cab (Dynamo HS-9) from skating rink. Repaired monitor not working. Pics

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    • rewrite wrote:

      Not testing the cab PSU is absolutely not going to help you with the cab at all.

      12v you'll need to measure at Jamma edge.
      Yes but my monitor is at electronic repair getting a recap and hopefully flyback. I cannot give it a full load yet without it. I did have my raiden 2 PCB hooked up to my superun.


      acblunden2 wrote:

      That flyback won't work for a K7000A. Post a pic of your chassis so we can confirm which chassis you have.
      I cant confirm. I brought my chassis to electronic repair along with the flyback.

      I think your right though. The ad was very vague.

      Moving along to joysticks.

      I got the il Eurosticks in a blue.

      I installed 2p but I cannot get some bolts off of 1P.

      The top of the bolts are rounded so there is no screw driver or ratchet set I can use for counter force against the nut.

      When I spin the nut the bolt spins with it. I cannot grip the other side with my pliers and I am noticing damage on the tines of the inside of the bolt.

      How do I deal with these stubborn round surface bolts?

    • hoagtech wrote:

      12v = 10.46V??

      12V runs the fan in the PSU, so that could be the reason why it's running erratically.

      For jamma boards, 10.46V is fine. As said before 12V usually just powers the audio amplifiers and those are usually designed to run on anything between 8-16 volts.

      Most likely a recap will bring your 12V up to spec.

      hoagtech wrote:

      Yes but my monitor is at electronic repair getting a recap and hopefully flyback. I cannot give it a full load yet without it. I did have my raiden 2 PCB hooked up to my superun.

      The monitor is powered by mains voltage, it won't affect the load on the PSU.

      hoagtech wrote:

      How do I deal with these stubborn round surface bolts?

      I make a cut with a Dremel on the face of the bolt and then use a flat headed screwdriver to hold it in place.
    • Well I have good news on the PSU side.

      I tested the jamma edge in the cab and got these readings:



      +5V=5.08
      -5V=-5.04
      +12V= 12.11

      I tested the ROM 5V and got 5.03

      Even better is I decided to leave it on for 20 minutes and the fan regulated itself to a lower RPM and sounded smooth and quiet.

      After 20 Minutes I tested the Jamma edge and got the exact same voltages as startup. A small victory. Thanks @acblunden2. I feel much better about the PSU and it looks cooler and safer than those Chinese ones.

    • I got the Monitor back from the repair man fully recapped and plugged it back in.

      The monitor got its inital static and the burn in started to glow.

      Then no image came from the Monitor and it just stayed that way.

      I would take a picture but who wants to see a TV that doesn't turn on?

      I offered to take the cabinet to his repair facility but he is not seeming to want to see it again.

      Is there basic on the connections I may be missing?

      My PSU is hooked up, Ground wire, and 2 clear clip on connectors the sit right next to each other on the chassis board.

      I don't understand a good way to troubleshoot this monitor.
    • hoagtech wrote:

      I offered to take the cabinet to his repair facility but he is not seeming to want to see it again.
      If he charged you money, bring it on back to him. Whether he wants it back or not, if he messed it up you should either get it fixed, or be given back your money.


      You should have, attached to the chassis from the cabinet:
      RGB connector of some sort.
      Power connector.
      Ground cable from the cabinet to the chassis somewhere.

      Possibly one ground from the tube to the chassis.
      Possibly degauss cable.

      If you sent out just the chassis and not the monitor then you'll also need to connect the yoke wires from the tube to the chassis. Their orientation and location matter, so make sure and plug them back in where they came out of.
      And a ground cable from the tube to the neckboard.

      Pictures of the chassis as it sits in the monitor would be useful in seeing if you've overlooked something.
      On the hunt for: Dinoking, Mushiking, Love & Berry, Egret 29, Grand Am Q25, Capcom New Concept 2, and Naomi guncabs.
    • I believe we have the exact same chassis, and I recently just painted my cab and took everything out of it. I made sure to take pictures of all the connections I disconnected, but I still feel intimidated by all the hookups. Looking forward to this, as I too am going to reassemble my cab very shortly.
    • Ok, firstly, check the screen pot on the flyback. I suspect that it may be possible the dude that repaired this for you dialed it all the way down (counter-clockwise). Turn it back up to see if you have an image (clockwise). It is the pot closer to the bottom on your flyback. The one on the top of the flyback is the focus pot.

      Here are the connections for a K7000A. If standing facing the cab from the back, here is what you should hook up in this order:
      1. The anode cap.
        • This is the circular rubber plug with metal rabbit ears that snaps into the the top center of the tube
        • The wire is red (usually) for this, the cap is black
        • This is comes off the top of the flyback
        • If touching this, make sure you discharged the monitor, even if you have discharged it previously as this can recharge itself
      2. The DAG wire
        • This is the wire the comes off the grounding strap that is wrapped around your tube from the left side
        • On this monitor, this wire is normally soldered onto the neckboard
        • Normally for maintenance/repair, this wire is snipped off, then re-attached with quick disconnects
      3. Power
        • This should be easy as the connectors there fit no where else
        • Just be mindful that there should be a green ground wire that should be a part of the connector (if it is a 3-position connector), or the green wire grounds to a bolt on the frame if the connector only has 2 positions
      4. Yoke connector
        • This is the wire that comes off the yoke (the copper metal coils on the tube's neck)
        • This connects to the header just above the flyback
      5. Video connector
        • This might be in two pieces w/RGB on one connector and Gnd and Sync on the other.
        • From the back edge of the board:
        • Pin 1=Red, pin 2= Green, pin 3=Blue, pin 7=Gnd/Black, pin 9 = Sync/White
      6. Then the degausse cable
        • It is can be inserted either way and is not keyed
      EDIT: If it has a remote board, make sure that is connected before you turn on the monitor on.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by acblunden2 ().

    • acblunden2 wrote:

      Ok, firstly, check the screen pot on the flyback. I suspect that it may be possible the dude that repaired this for you dialed it all the way down (counter-clockwise). Turn it back up to see if you have an image (clockwise). It is the pot closer to the bottom on your flyback. The one on the top of the flyback is the focus pot.

      Here are the connections for a K7000A. If standing facing the cab from the back, here is what you should hook up in this order:
      1. The anode cap.
        • This is the circular rubber plug with metal rabbit ears that snaps into the the top center of the tube
        • The wire is red (usually) for this, the cap is black
        • This is comes off the top of the flyback
        • If touching this, make sure you discharged the monitor, even if you have discharged it previously as this can recharge itself
      2. The DAG wire
        • This is the wire the comes off the grounding strap that is wrapped around your tube from the left side
        • On this monitor, this wire is normally soldered onto the neckboard
        • Normally for maintenance/repair, this wire is snipped off, then re-attached with quick disconnects
      3. Power
        • This should be easy as the connectors there fit no where else
        • Just be mindful that there should be a green ground wire that should be a part of the connector (if it is a 3-position connector), or the green wire grounds to a bolt on the frame if the connector only has 2 positions
      4. Yoke connector
        • This is the wire that comes off the yoke (the copper metal coils on the tube's neck)
        • This connects to the header just above the flyback
      5. Video connector
        • This might be in two pieces w/RGB on one connector and Gnd and Sync on the other.
        • From the back edge of the board:
        • Pin 1=Red, pin 2= Green, pin 3=Blue, pin 7=Gnd/Black, pin 9 = Sync/White
      6. Then the degausse cable
        • It is can be inserted either way and is not keyed
      EDIT: If it has a remote board, make sure that is connected before you turn on the monitor on.
      I turned the voltage pot all the way clockwise and got no image.

      Heres some pics:

      Model info:



      Anode Cap (possibly not pressed in, but don't trust the 10 minute auto discharge to try)



      The repair man stated he soldered missing pots on the PCB as well, so these were added:



      Here is my RGB connection. I am pretty sure the connector is seated:




      @acblunden2

      I tried the swivel

      I don't know how to discharge and test connection on anode.

      The yoke connector was never disconnected as I didn't remove the monitor from the chassis.

      I am not sure about the deguass cable.

      I brought in my monitor inside its cage and disconnected maybe 3 cables total.
    • You're never going to get an image with that chassis the way that it is now. You should have left well enough alone. But too late.

      Firstly, you have a Wells Gardner K7000. Not a Zenith K7000A version. That is good news as the Wells Gardner version of the K7000 chassis has a readily available flyback. Here is the bad news, you have the wrong flyback installed on that chassis. As is, you will never get that monitor running with that flyback. That isn't the fault of the electronics repair shop. That is your fault. You took your chassis to them and told them to install that flyback. They probably spent hours trying to get it to fit. And when they did and handed it back to you, told you to never come back. The Wells Gardner K7000 flyback is tricky enough as it is to install. But that you gave them the wrong flyback, probably made it next to impossible.

      The instructions I left for you were precise. If you did not remove those connections and did not reinstall them as I outlined, your monitor likely won't work. Here is what you should do, see if you can get someone in your area that knows this stuff to help you with a Wells Gardner K7000 chassis/monitor. Post on Craigslist. IMO, don't think you have the chops to do this on your own based on the questions you ask; at least, not at this point. Send your chassis off to a real specialists for repair. PNL Video in Baldwin Park, CA are guys I would recommend. Or buy a new rebuilt chassis which will run you about $175.

      The post was edited 1 time, last by acblunden2 ().

    • nem wrote:

      acblunden2 wrote:

      That isn't the fault of the electronics repair shop.
      If they didn't test the chassis, it sure as hell is. No decent repair shop would do any repairs to a chassis and not test if it works afterwards.

      @hoagtech, ask them if they tested it.
      Nah, it's on him. Reminds me of a trivial event I experienced yesterday. I need a hair cut badly. I looked up a barber shop on Yelp that was nearby. When I drove there, I saw pictures of Black people on the windows looking fly! All faded up nicely, others with nice hair extensions and all. I am Asian, so guess what: my hair is still long =).

      Several misguided (no offense) over-eager misteps were taken here:
      1. He didn't take it to a decent repair shop; one that specializes in arcade monitor repair. He took it to an mom and pop's electronics repair shop and asked them to recap it and replace the flyback.
      2. He gave them the wrong flyback to replace (FYI: this is the flyback he needs).
      3. I urged him to post a pic of his chassis so we could help him out. But he got ahead of himself. We can still help the guy out, but he needs to slow his roll a bit.


      They did exactly what he asked them to do. I am pretty sure a mom and pop's electronics repair shop isn't going to have a JAMMA setup to test an arcade monitor. Doubt he even took the tube in, just the chassis. That's on the shoulders of an uninformed consumer. His monitor was working. He got ahead of himself. The monitor needed calibration, maybe the red transistor replaced, but not full on cap kit and flyback replacement, at least not until after an attempt at calibration.

      @hoagtech, Slow your roll man. We'll help you out. This forum is nice to new entrants into the hobby.
    • It's on the electronics repair shop 100%. If you don't know what you're doing (like CRT work), then you decline doing the work. Fuck that shop.

      I agree, he got ahead of himself. The problem is when you're new to this hobby you take everything as gospel. Post 14 is where he was recommended getting a new flyback. No idea why, he had a perfectly working one on his monitor. Post 36 is where he's told his monitor "is believed to be a K7000A". People pick up on these things. He had bought something really cool (his first arcade cab I think?), naturally he was antsy to get the thing going.

      Anyway, it's absolutely not the end of the world. Hopefully it's just the flyback. Should be easy enough to replace.
    • nem wrote:

      It's on the electronics repair shop 100%. If you don't know what you're doing (like CRT work), then put in the sweat equity till you get what you want.
      FYP :)

      Anyhoo, we can debate that, but it gets no where. OP needs to get his arcade working. That's the mission. His options now are:
      1. If he wants to spend the least amount of money, borrow a good quality soldering iron from someone he knows (if he doesn't have one already), and replace the flyback on his own which will set him back about $40.
        • Hope that the installation of the wrong flyback didn't fry anything else
        • If it did, then he is looking at more costs and I doubt he has the tooling to fix those other things
      2. Call PnL Video in Baldwin Park, CA (as they are the best in terms of pricing). Tell them he needs a K7000 chassis repaired with a new flyback. Ask for a quote. Add the quote cost in along with shipping costs to and from. Whatever that sums out to being.....
      3. ........subtract that from the cost of an overhauled/rebuilt K7000 which is $175+shipping.
      Given his skill and experience, I would go with option 3. Then sell the chassis as parts board to get some money back.
    • acblunden2 wrote:

      nem wrote:

      acblunden2 wrote:

      That isn't the fault of the electronics repair shop.
      If they didn't test the chassis, it sure as hell is. No decent repair shop would do any repairs to a chassis and not test if it works afterwards.
      @hoagtech, ask them if they tested it.
      Nah, it's on him. Reminds me of a trivial event I experienced yesterday. I need a hair cut badly. I looked up a barber shop on Yelp that was nearby. When I drove there, I saw pictures of Black people on the windows looking fly! All faded up nicely, others with nice hair extensions and all. I am Asian, so guess what: my hair is still long =).
      Several misguided (no offense) over-eager misteps were taken here:
      1. He didn't take it to a decent repair shop; one that specializes in arcade monitor repair. He took it to an mom and pop's electronics repair shop and asked them to recap it and replace the flyback.
      2. He gave them the wrong flyback to replace (FYI: this is the flyback he needs).
      3. I urged him to post a pic of his chassis so we could help him out. But he got ahead of himself. We can still help the guy out, but he needs to slow his roll a bit.


      They did exactly what he asked them to do. I am pretty sure a mom and pop's electronics repair shop isn't going to have a JAMMA setup to test an arcade monitor. Doubt he even took the tube in, just the chassis. That's on the shoulders of an uninformed consumer. His monitor was working. He got ahead of himself. The monitor needed calibration, maybe the red transistor replaced, but not full on cap kit and flyback replacement, at least not until after an attempt at calibration.

      @hoagtech, Slow your roll man. We'll help you out. This forum is nice to new entrants into the hobby.
      Thanks for the reply guys. I am fresh on the scene and know little about arcade hardware.

      I knew petitioning the electronics repair man that he did not specialize in CRT but he claimed he had done it in the 80's. He's an old Japanese man in a very small business suite.

      I was hoping his soldering skills and the kits I ordered were gonna be good enough to get my monitor in working condition. But I ordered the wrong kits and asked him to install it. He also told me he had no way of testing it.

      He did say he would call me with a recommendation from one of his friends next Monday.

      I think the best bet would be having him install my old flyback from what I've gathered from your guy's advice.

      Those new pots got me a little worried.

      Is my monitor an K7000A? or just K7000?