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ShootTheCore

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As some of you may already know, I recently assumed hosting and webmaster responsibilities for JAMMArcade.net from Porchy. I decided to kick off my new role by introducing what I believe will be a useful resource for arcade repair technicians - an Arcade PCB Encyclopedia.

I have long admired the Console 5 Wiki as a comprehensive source of information for video game consoles. A typical console page will have a capacitor list, describe common faults, and collect manufacturer white papers. The JAMMArcade.net Arcade PCB Encyclopedia will attempt to accomplish the same thing for arcade boards.

My goal is to eventually document the following information in one page each for most arcade boards:
  • High quality photos of the boards – both originals and bootlegs
  • Notable ICs and their function
  • Capacitor list
  • Common faults and solutions to those faults
  • Protection mechanisms
  • Schematics and Datasheets
  • Links to other reference resources on the Internet
Given the number of arcade games produced, it may take several years to assemble these resources for every game, but I want to at least start with the most popular and most documented ones. I highly value credit for the original researchers and strive for proper attribution.

The Encyclopedia launches today with information on three boards and I will try to write up 1 - 2 more each week - each one takes a while to research!

Please take a look at the first three Encyclopedia postings and let me know what you think. If you spot any mistakes or are interested in contributing to the Encyclopedia or to other areas of JAMMArcade.net, please let me know.

https://jammarcade.net/arcade-pcb-encyclopedia/
 
Also just so you're not duplicating efforts https://www.mvs-scans.com covers this information for MVS, CPS1, CPS2, CPS3, and Brezzasoft Crystal System
and http://www.igspgm.com/ covers it for PGM, PGM2, and PGM3
So I think cross-linking with those other sites would be good and then built out focusing on other systems that aren't already covered.
 
This is exactly what I've wanted to see for a long time. There are TROVES of information out there, but it's so frustratingly fragmented and, sometimes, gatekept.

Kudos for taking this step -- if you need any assistance or resources I'd be glad to help with what I can (probably not much, unfortunately).
 
Also for CV1K there is a simpler hi-score reset which will work on all PCBs not just the one which stores data in EEPROM.

During boot hold P1 Right+A+B+C and P2 Left+A+B+C - Forcibly initialise non-volatile data (EEPROM or NAND settings area)

from: MAME, cv1k.cpp
 
You are a prince and a scholar!
Thank you for stepping up and saving this valuable resource. <3
 
This is exactly what I've wanted to see for a long time. There are TROVES of information out there, but it's so frustratingly fragmented and, sometimes, gatekept.

That was exactly my thinking on it too - there's so much great information already out there in forums, blogs, etc but it's all so fragmented...

Also for CV1K there is a simpler hi-score reset which will work on all PCBs not just the one which stores data in EEPROM.

During boot hold P1 Right+A+B+C and P2 Left+A+B+C - Forcibly initialise non-volatile data (EEPROM or NAND settings area)

from: MAME, cv1k.cpp

Thank you for the advice - I somehow missed that when I was reading through the opening comments on the MAME driver! I assume it's the CV1000-D games that save high scores in NAND since they don't have access to the EPROM embedded in the RTC with the RTC removed on those boards?
 
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