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Escher

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JAMMA Video Standard

The JAMMA Video Standard, or JVS, is an updated version of an earlier protocol standard simply called JAMMA. JAMMA is an analog protocol which became the standard connection scheme for almost all arcade machines built by Namco Bandai, Sega, Taito, Tecmo, Capcom, Konami and Atlus, among others since 1985.
Released in 1996, JVS supports several modernized features such as USB and VGA support. Assuming the protocol and connections are utilized for a custom arcade game board, one could develop a brand new arcade game which could be played on any JVS-compatible arcade cabinet. That is what this project intends to accomplish, with the addition of a customized and built-from-scratch cabinet.

Preliminary Details

After extensive research into JVS, it was decided that a custom PCB would have to be built to support the functionality. Additionally, a separate I/O board would have to be designed to provide and interface between the physical arcade controls and the game. JVS Block Diagram
A microcontroller would of course be necessary, and after researching for uCs used in embedded gaming projects, theParallax Propeller P8X32A-D40 40-pin DIP package microcontroller was chosen due to its robustness as well as specification ability to emulate the JVS protocol.
Assisting me with this project is u/looksLikeImOnTop, who has already put in significant legwork to create the schematics for the cartridge and I/O board.

Battle Plan

Several different design schema could be used to guide this project, and I chose to focus on embedded hardware first. The reasoning for this is that everything else concerning the cabinet, peripherals, outputs, and inputs, are dependent upon the nature of the game designed for it. However the control and game boards will be the same regardless of the game. This means that schematics and board designs are up to bat, and for that CadSoft EAGLE PCB design software was chosen.

Preliminary Designs

Based upon the microcontroller specifications, the following schematic and board designs were generated withing EAGLE:
Schematic
Board

Keep in mind these are preliminary, and connections/modifications/a lot still has to be done. I will start adding more detail to these reports if people show interest.
Stay tuned!
 
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plasia

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Are you going to release the io board separate from the rest of your system? A lot of people would be interested.
 

Escher

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Yes i believe so. I'm actually considering just buying a JVS I/O board and only custom-making the game cartridge, since there's no real need to re-invent the wheel here. I could then extend the project to being completely focused on easily creating your own arcade game cartridges. We'll see!
 

plasia

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Well there's not exactly a lot of choice around when it comes to JVS I/O boards, I'd actually consider doing that before working on the other parts, might be able to partially fund it!
 

Escher

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Wow that's surprising, from my research I was under the impressing the boards were separate, and the I/O board fairly common.

The I/O board is certainly the more difficult to make, and my experience with Eagle is at a toddler's roughly, so if someone with experience could walk me through a few steps I would make great time.

I may take you up on your offer! Thanks!
 

defor

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The I/O board is certainly the more difficult to make, and my experience with Eagle is at a toddler's roughly, so if someone with experience could walk me through a few steps I would make great time.
Sparkfun has a few really solid tutorials on Eagle.
https://www.sparkfun.com/search/results?term=eagle

Of course, there's a LOT better software out there than Eagle (I still use Eagle for simple things like the 2x6 Universal dongle and ST-V right angle adapter, because it's what I learned first, but likey to switch over to something more robust for the Naomi filter board project)
 

Escher

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I think because of the simplicity of the boards, I'll stick with Eagle. No need to get fancy with my first PCB design project.
 

Escher

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Is there any specific reason that everyone would be interested in an I/O board?
 
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